Pengolodh (s.c) (pengolodh_sc) wrote,
Pengolodh (s.c)
pengolodh_sc

Fictional Treaty on limitaion of naval armaments

To explain, I'm involved in a little sim wherein different participants hold different countries in a world slightly different from ours. The timestamp is 1920, after the world war, and the neutral and the victorious nations get together to negotiate a treaty of limitation on naval armament. We will agree on a treaty, and then game the world year by year up till around the historical time for World War 2.

The participating countries are The Kingdom of Greece, The Empire of Australia, The Republic of France, The Philippine Empire, The Kingdom of the United Netherlands (Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, with the historical Belgian and Netherlands colonies), The Kingdom of Nordmark (present-day Finland, Sweden, Norway, Faeroes (tripled in size), Shetland, Iceland, Greenland, and Newfoundland (doubled in size and renamed Vinland)), The Kingdom of Italy, The Empire of Japan, The Kingdom of Brandenburg (ethinically and culturally German kingdom in the Pacific on a bunch of fictional islands), The Kingdom of Iberia (Spain and Portugal, with their historical colonies outside of South America), The South-African Empire (South-Africa, with a bunch of extra territory up along the East and West coasts of Africa, as well as MAdagaskar and a colony in South America encompassing today's Uruguay and surrounding territory), The Russian Federation, The Atlantis Empire (Atlantis, with colonies in today's Morocco), The United Kingdom, and The United States of America.

I represent the Kingdom of Nordmark.

Nordmark's proposal to a treaty of naval arms-limitation

His Majesty the King of Nordmark (the United Kingdom of Norwegr, Svea, 
Göta, and Finland), lord Earl of Färoyar, lord Earl of Iceland, lord 
Earl of Vinland, lord Herse over Greenland and Hjaltland: 

Desiring to contribute to the maintenance of the general peace, and to 
reduce the burdens of competition in armament; 

Has resolved, with a view to accomplishing these purposes, to strive to 
conclude a treaty between Nordmark and the other naval powers of the 
world, to limit their respective naval armament, and to that end has 
appointed as his Plenipotentiaries to act on the behalf of His Majesty
in this matter; 

   The Honourable Baron Fridhjof Nansen of Greenland, Knight of His 
      Majesty's Order of the Seraphim, Knight of His Majesty's Order 
      of the Norwegian Lion, His Majesty's Lord Stallare of the Privy 
      Council
   The Honourable Count Hermann Wedel-Jarlsberg of Jarlsberg and 
      Laurvigen, Grand Cross and Chain of His Majesty's Royal Order of 
      St. Olaf, His Majesty's Minister of Foreign Affairs
   The Honourable Gustaf Dyrssen, Grand Cross of His Majesty's Order 
      of the Sword, His Majesty's Minister of the Navy
   The Honourable Christian Michelsen, Grand Commander of His Majesty's 
      Order of the Northern Star, His Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary 
      and Plenipotentiary to the Atlantis Empire; 

Who, having due authority by His Majesty, communicate the following 
desires and proposals as regards a limitation in naval armament:


PART 1 - DEFINITON OF DURATION AND EFFECTS OF THE TREATY

    I.     CONSEQUENCE OF SIGNATURE
   The Contracting Powers agree to limit their respective naval armament
   as provided in the present Treaty. 


    II.    DURATION OF THE TREATY

   The treaty shall come into effect on January 1st 1921, and remain
   in effect until December 31st 1935, when it shall expire, unless the
   Contracting Powers shall choose to convene a new conference to
   negotiatiate a treaty to supplement or supercede the present treaty
   prior to that date.


    III.   LIMITATION TO SUPPLEMENTING AND SUPERCEDING TREATIES

   A treaty intended to supplement or supercede the present treaty, and
   which comes into effect prior to the expiration of the present
   treaty, may not give wider limits than the present treaty, unless it
   carries the signature of agreement of all Contracting Powers of the
   present treaty.  


    IV.  LIMITATIONS TO TREATIES WITH GERMANY

   No Contracting Power may conclude a treaty of naval armament or
   mutual defence with Germany wherein Germany is allowed a greater
   strength of naval power than that provided for in the peace-treaty of
   1919.


    V.   LIMITATIONS TO TREATIES WITH GERMANY CONCERNING SUBMARINES

   Notwithstanding Part 1, Article III above, no Contracting Power may
   under any circumstance conclude any form of treaty with Germany
   giving Germany the permission to purchase or build submarines of any
   nature.


    VI.  MEASURES IN PREPARATION OF EXPIRATION OF THE TREATY

   A conference to negotiate an extension of the present treaty, or a
   treaty to replace the present treaty and come into effect upon the
   expiration of the present treaty, shall be convened no later than 1
   (one) year and nine months prior to the expiration of the present
   treaty.


    VII. NON-CONTRACTING POWERS WISHING TO BE SIGNATORY POWERS

   Any Non-Contracting Power excepting Germany wishing to become
   signatory to the treaty may do so, and will be admitted as a
   Signatory Power, allowed tonnage in all areas to be equal to that
   of Greece.  Such Signatory Powers shall not benefit from Part 3,
   Section A, Article VI below, or from Part 3, Section B, Article V
   below.


PART 2 - DEFINITIONS OF TERMS IN THE TREATY

   For the purposes of the present Treaty, the following expressions are
   to be understood in the sense defined in this Part. 


       I.    CAPITAL SHIP
      A capital ship, in the case of ships hereafter built, is defined
      as a surfave vessel of war, not an aircraft carrier, whose
      displacement exceeds 13,000 tons (13,208 metric tons) standard
      displacement, or which carries a gun with a calibre exceeding 8.2
      inches (210 millimetres), with exceptions as noted in Part 2,
      Article IV below, and which is not so constructed or reconstructed
      that aircraft can land thereon. 


       II.   AIRCRAFT CARRIER
      An aircraft carrier is defined as a surface vessel of war with a
      standard displacement greater than 600 tons (610 metric tons)
      designed for the specific purpose of carrying aircraft.  It must
      be so constructed that aircraft can be launched therefrom and
      landed thereon, and not designed and constructed for carrying a
      more powerful armament than that allowed to it under Part 3,
      Section B, Article VII below.  Any vessel with a standard
      displacement exceeding 600 tons (610 metric tons) and so
      constructed or reconstructed that aircraft can be landed thereon,
      shall be considered an aircraft-carrier, for the purposes of this
      treaty.


       III.  CRUISER
      Surface vessel of war, other than capital ships or aircraft
      carriers, the standard displacement of which exceeds 2,000 tons
      (2,032 metric tons), or whose largest gun exceeds the calibre of
      5.1 inches (130 mm), and which is not so constructed or
      reconstructed that aircraft can land thereon, and which is
      designed or rebuilt for a maximum speed greater than 24 knots,
      divided into two categories, as follows: 
      Sub-category (a):  Cruisers displacing not more than 13,000 tons
                         (13,208 metric tons) standard displacement, and
                         not carrying a gun above the calibre of 8.2
                         inches (210 millimetres)
      Sub-category (b):  Cruisers displacing not more than 8,000 tons
                         (8,128 metric tons) standard displacement, not
                         carrying a gun above the calibre of 6 inches
                         (153 millimetres)


       IV.    COAST-DEFENCE ARMOURCLAD
      Surface vessels of war, other than capital ships, aircraft-
      carriers or cruisers, the standard displacement of which exceeds
      1,500 tons and does not exceed 8,000 tons, whose largest guns do
      not exceed the calibre of 12 inches (305 millimetres) in calibre,
      and which is no so constructed or reconstructed that aircraft can
      land thereon, and which is not designed or rebuilt for a maximum
      speed in excess of 24 knots.


       V.   DESTROYER
      Surface vessels of war the standard displacement of which does not
      exceed 2,000 tons (2,032 metric tons), whose largest guns do not
      exceed the calibre of 5.1 inches (130 mm) calibre, and which is
      not so constructed or reconstructed that aircraft may land
      thereon, and which is  designed or rebuilt with a maximum speed
      greater than 24 knots, divided into two categories, as
      follows:
      Sub-category (a):  Destroyers displacing not more than 2,000 tons
                     (2,032 metric tons) standard displacement
      Sub-category (b):  Destroyers displacing not more than 1,600 tons
                     (1,626 metric tons) standard displacement


       VI.    SLOOP
      Surface vessels of war the standard displacement of which does not
      exceed 1,500 tons (1,524 metric tons), whose largest guns do not
      exceed the calibre of 5.1 inches (130 mm) calibre, which is not
      fitted with or deisgned for the possibility of launching
      torpedoes, which is not so constructed or reconstructed that
      aircraft may land thereon, and which is not designed or rebuilt
      for a speed greater than 24 knots.


       VII.   SUBMARINE
      Any vessel designed to be capable of operating in a fully
      submerged condition for any length of time.


       VIII.  STANDARD DISPLACEMENT OF A SURFACE VESSEL
      The standard displacement of a ship is the displacement of the
      ship complete, fully manned, engined, and equipped ready for sea,
      including all armament and ammunition, equipment, outfit,
      provisions and fresh water for crew, miscellaneous stores and
      implements of every description that are intended to be carried
      in war, but without fuel or reserve feed water on board. 


       IX.    STANDARD DISPLACEMENT OF A SUBMARINE

      The standard displacement of a submarine is the surface
      displacement of the vessel complete (exclusive of the water in
      non-watertight structure) fully manned, engined, and equipped
      ready for sea, including all armament and ammunition, equipment,
      outfit, provisions for crew, miscellaneous stores, and implements
      of every description that are intended to be carried in war, but
      without fuel, lubricating oil, fresh water or ballast water of any
      kind on board. 


       X.     TON

      The word "ton" in the present Treaty, except in the expression
      "metric tons", shall be understood to mean the ton of 2240 pounds
      (1016 kilos). 

      Vessels now completed shall retain their present ratings of
      displacement tonnage in accordance with their national system of
      measurement. However, a Power expressing displacement in metric
      tons shall be considered for the application of the present Treaty
      as owning only the equivalent displacement in tons of 2240 pounds. 

      A vessel completed hereafter shall be rated at its displacement
      tonnage when in the standard condition defined herein. 


PART 3 - LIMITATIONS OF NAVAL ARMAMENTS

A.  CAPITAL SHIPS

    I.
   No capital ship exceeding 40,000 tons (40,640 metric tons) standard
   displacement shall be acquired by, or constructed by, for, or within
   the jurisdiction of, any of the Contracting Powers.  


    II.
   No capital ship of any of the Contracting Powers shall carry a gun
   with a calibre in excess of 15 inches (381 millimetres).


    III.
   The strength of capital ships in the navies of each Contracting Power
   shall be limited as follows:
   (a) Each Contracting Power shall be allowed a total tonnage allowance
       of capital ships, and may build or retain ships until that
       Contracting Power's tonnage-allowance has been filled, but not
       exceeded.  
   (b) Each Contracting Power shall be allowed a maximum number
       allowance of capital ships, and may build or retain up to that
       number of capital ships, provided that the total tonnage
       allowance of capital ships for that Contracting Power is not
       thereby exceeded.  


   The aggregate tonnage of capital ship permitted to each Contracting
   Power shall be in whole multiples of the maximum tonnage allowable
   per hull as per Part 3, Section A, Article I above.


    IV.

   The maximum number of capital ships, and the maximum total tonnage of
   capital ships, in tons of 2240 lbs (1016 kilos), each Contracting 
   Power shall be allowed to possess:

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . . . . .Number of. . . . Maximum . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Capital Ships. . tonnage . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . 120,000 tons. .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . 200,000 tons. .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . 200,000 tons. .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . 200,000 tons. .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . . 6 . . . . . 200,000 tons. .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . 280,000 tons. .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . 280,000 tons. .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . 360,000 tons. .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . 360,000 tons. .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . 360,000 tons. .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . 440,000 tons. .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . 440,000 tons. .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . 440,000 tons. .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . 20. . . . . 600,000 tons. .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . . 21. . . . . 640,000 tons. .
   


    V.
   The Contracting Powers may retain respectively capital ships that
   were in existence, or under construction and not suspended, on June
   1st 1920, such that the numbers and tonnage of capital ships in
   possession of each Contracting Power, including the units under
   construction, shall not exceed the numbers and tonnage allowed each
   Contracting Power, as prescribed in Part 3, Section A, Article IV
   above.  The capital ships to be retained shall be the newest capital
   ships of that Contracting Power.  On the coming into effect of the
   present Treaty, all other capital ships, built or building, shall be
   disposed of as prescribed in Part 3, Section J, Articles I-VIII
   below.  


    VI.
   Each Contracting Power that under Part 3, Section A, Article V above,
   retains capital ships laid down prior to January 1st 1911, and has
   not given up capital ships laid down after January 1st 1911, shall be
   permitted to lay down two capital ships in replacement of two
   existing capital ships that would otherwise be retained under the
   treaty, which are to be disposed of as per Part 3, Section J,
   Articles I-VIII below.


B.  AIRCRAFT-CARRIERS

    I.
   The tonnage of aircraft-carriers allowed to each Contracting Power
   shall be fixed in relation to the tonnage of capital ships allowed to 
   each Contracting Power, by a ratio of 1 (one) ton of aircraft-carrier
   tonnage for each 4 (four) tons of capital ship tonnage, as follows,
   in tons of 2240 lbs (1016 kilos):

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum . . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tonnage . . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50,000 tons. . .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50,000 tons. . .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . . . . . . . .50,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90,000 tons. . .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110,000 tons. . .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110,000 tons. . .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110,000 tons. . .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150,000 tons. . .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . . . . . . . 160,000 tons. . .


    II.
   No aircraft-carrier exceeding 22,000 tons (22352 metric tons)
   standard displacement shall be acquired by, or constructed by, for,
   or within the jurisdiction of, any of the Contracting Powers.


    III.
   Notwithstanding Part 3, Section B, Article II above, any of the
   Contracting Powers may, provided that its total tonnage allowance of
   aircraft carriers is not thereby exceeded, build not more than two
   aircraft carriers, each of a tonnage of not more than 27,000 tons
   (27,432 metric tons) standard displacement, and in order to effect
   economy any of the Contracting Powers may use for this purpose any
   two of their ships, whether constructed or in course of construction,
   which would otherwise be scrapped under the provisions of Part 3,
   Section A, Article V above. The armament of any aircraft carriers
   exceeding 22,000 tons (22,354 metric tons) standard displacement
   shall be in accordance with the requirements of Part 3, Section B,
   Article VII below. 


    IV.
   There shall be no limit on the number of aircraft-carriers each
   Contracting Power may possess, provided that total tonnage allowance
   of aircraft-carriers for that Contracting Power, as prescribed in
   Part 3, Section B, Article I above, is not thereby exceeded.


    V.
   The replacement of aircraft carriers shall be effected only as
   prescribed in Part 3, Section L, Article Ia below, provided, however,
   that all aircraft carrier tonnage in existence or building on the
   coming into effect of this treaty, shall be considered experimental,
   and may be replaced, within the total tonnage limit prescribed in
   Part I, Section B, Article I above, without regard to its age.  Such
   experimental tonnage shall nonetheless be charged against the total
   tonnage of aircraft-carriers allowed to a Contracting Power.

   Contracting Powers that wish to make replacements of experimental
   tonnage in existence or building at the time of coming into effect of
   this treaty without regard to its age must, however, commence with
   these replacements, by way of laying down the hull of each
   replacement, no later than five years after the coming into effect of
   this treaty, or the right to make replacements of experimental
   tonnage without regard to its age shall be forfeit.
    

    VI.
   The Contracting Powers shall be allowed to utilise up to 50% of their
   allowed tonnage of aircraft carriers as cruiser-tonnage of category
   (b), as defined in Part 2, Article III above, with no effect on the
   allowed tonnage of cruiser-category (a).


    VIII.
   No aircraft carrier of any of the Contracting Powers shall carry a
   gun with a calibre in excess of 8.2 inches (210 millimetres). If the
   armament carried includes guns exceeding 5.9 inches (150 millimetres)
   in calibre the total number of guns carried, except anti-aircraft
   guns and guns not exceeding 5.1 inches (130 millimetres), shall not
   exceed six. If alternatively the armament contains no guns exceeding
   5.9 inches (150 millimetres) in calibre, the number of guns is not
   limited. In either case the number of anti-aircraft guns and of guns
   not exceeding 5.1 inches (130 millimetres) is not limited.


C.  CRUISERS

    I.
   Each Contracting Power shall be permitted a tonnage of cruisers equal
   to the tonnage of capital ships allowed that Contracting Power, as
   follows, in tons of 2240 lbs (1016 kilos):

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum . . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tonnage . . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200,000 tons. . .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200,000 tons. . .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . . . . . . 200,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . 360,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360,000 tons. . .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440,000 tons. . .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440,000 tons. . .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440,000 tons. . .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600,000 tons. . .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . . . . . . 640,000 tons. . .


    II.
   Of the cruiser-tonnage allowed each nation in Part 3, Section C,
   Article I above, not more than 30% shall be allowed to be used for
   cruisers of category (a).

   The maximum tonnage, in tons of 2240 lbs (1016 kilos), of cruisers in
   sub-category (a) each Contracting Power shall be allowed to possess:

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum . . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tonnage . . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60,000 tons. . .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60,000 tons. . .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . . . . . . . .60,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108,000 tons. . .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132,000 tons. . .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132,000 tons. . .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132,000 tons. . .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180,000 tons. . .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . . . . . . . 192,000 tons. . .


    IV.
   The number of cruisers in the navies of each Contracting Power shall
   be limited by the maximum amount of cruiser tonnage allowed each
   Contracting Power.  There shall be no limit on the number of cruisers
   each Contracting Power may possess, provided that the total tonnage
   of such vessels shall not exceed the total cruiser tonnage allowed
   that Contracting Power.


    V.
   Each Contracting Power shall be permitted to convert up to 10% of the
   tonnage originally allowed that nation for cruiser-construction, to
   destroyer-tonnage.  Such a conversion shall not affect the maximum
   tonnage that Contracting Power is allowed to use for cruisers of
   category (a).  No Contracting Power shall be permitted to convert any
   tonnage originally allowed that nation for cruiser construction, to
   aircraft-carrier tonnage.  


    VI.
   No vessel of war exceeding 13,000 tons (13,208 metric tons) standard
   displacement, other than a capital ship or aircraft carrier, shall be
   acquired by, or constructed by, for, or within the jurisdiction of,
   any of the Contracting Powers. Vessels not specifically built as
   fighting ships nor taken in time of peace under government control
   for fighting purposes, which are employed on fleet duties or as troop
   transports or in some other way for the purpose of assisting in the
   prosecution of hostilities otherwise than as fighting ships, shall
   not be within the limitations of this Article. 


    VII.
   No vessel of war of any of the Contracting Powers, hereafter laid
   down, other than a capital ship, shall carry a gun with a calibre in
   excess of 8.2 inches (210 millimetres). 


D.  COAST-DEFENCE SHIPS

    I.
   Each Contracting Power shall be allowed to retain, build or acquire
   armoured vessels of a type suitable for coastal defence, whose
   aggregate tonnage does not exceed the maximum tonnage of a single
   capital ship as defined in Part 3, Section A, Article I above.  This
   tonnage shall not be charged against any other tonnage as defined in
   the treaty.


    II.
   No armoured vessel retained, built or acquired for coast-defence as
   permitted in PArt 3, Section D, Article I above, for, by, or within
   the jurisdiction of a Contracting Power, shall exceed 8,000 tons
   (8,128 metric tons) standard displacement, nor carry guns exceeding a
   calibre of 12 inches (305 millimetres), nor be designed or rebuilt
   for a speed exceeding 24 knots


E.  DESTROYERS

    I.
   The tonnage of destroyers allowed to each Contracting Power shall be
   fixed in relation to the tonnage of capital ships allowed to each
   Contracting Power, by a ratio of 4 (four) tons of destroyer tonnage
   for each 10 (ten) tons of capital ship tonnage.  Of this tonnage, a
   maximum of 20% may be constructed under the limits of sub-category
   (a); the remainder must be built as sub-category (b).

   The total tonnage of destroyers, in tons of 2240 lbs (1016 kilos),
   each Contracting Power shall be allowed to possess:

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum . . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tonnage . . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80,000 tons. . .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80,000 tons. . .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . . . . . . .80,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112,000 tons. . .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . 144,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144,000 tons. . .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176,000 tons. . .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176,000 tons. . .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176,000 tons. . .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240,000 tons. . .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . . . . . . 256,000 tons. . .


    II.
   Of the destroyer-tonnage allowed each nation in Part 1, Section E,
   Article I above, not more than 20% shall be allowed to be used for
   destroyers of sub-category (a).

   The maximum tonnage, in tons of 2240 lbs (1016 kilos), of destroyers
   in sub-category (a) each Contracting Power shall be allowed to
   possess:

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum . . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tonnage . . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,600 tons. . .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,000 tons. . .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,000 tons. . .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . . . . . . . .12,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,800 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,800 tons. . .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21,600 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21,600 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21,600 tons. . .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,400 tons. . .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,400 tons. . .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26,400 tons. . .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36,000 tons. . .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . . . . . . . .38,400 tons. . .


    III.
   The number of destroyers in the navies of each Contracting Power
   shall be limited by the maximum amount of destroyer tonnage allowed
   each Contracting Power.  There shall be no limit on the number of
   destroyers each Contracting Power may possess, provided that the
   total tonnage of such vessels shall not exceed the total destroyer
   tonnage allowed that Contracting Power.


    IV.
   The Contracting Powers shall be allowed to convert up to 10% of their
   allowed tonnage of destroyers to cruiser-tonnage of sub-category (b),
   as defined in Part 2, Article III above, with no effect on the
   allowed tonnage of cruiser-category (a).


F.  SLOOPS

    I.
   The tonnage of sloops allowed to each Contracting Power shall be
   fixed in relation to the tonnage of destroyers allowed to each
   Contracting Power, by a ratio of 4 (four) tons of sloop tonnage for
   each 10 (ten) tons of destroyer tonnage.

   The total tonnage of sloops, in tons of 2240 lbs (1016 kilos), each
   Contracting Power shall be allowed to possess:

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum . . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tonnage . . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19,200 tons. . .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32,000 tons. . .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32,000 tons. . .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . . . . . . .32,000 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44,800 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44,800 tons. . .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57,600 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . .57,600 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57,600 tons. . .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70,400 tons. . .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70,400 tons. . .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70,400 tons. . .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96,000 tons. . .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . . . . . . 102,400 tons. . .



    II.
   No sloop belonging to a Contracting Power may be fitted with
   apparatus for launching torpedoes, and any sloop built or rebuilt for
   a Contracting Power with such apparatus shall be charged against the
   tonnage of destroyers allowed the Contracting Power.


    III.
   The number of sloops in the navies of each Contracting Power shall be
   limited solely by the maximum amount of sloop tonnage allowed each
   Contracting Power.  There shall be no limit on the number of sloops
   each Contracting Power may possess, provided that the total tonnage
   of such vessels shall not exceed the total sloop tonnage allowed that
   Contracting Power.


G.  SUBMARINES

    I.
   No submarine the standard displacement of which exceeds 1,500 tons
   (1,524 metric tons) or with a gun whose calibre exceeds 5.1 inches
   (130 mm) shall be acquired by or constructed by or for any of the
   Contracting Powers. 


    II.
   Each of the Contracting Power may, however, retain, build or acquire
   a maximum number of three submarines of a standard displacement not
   exceeding 2,800 tons (2,845 metric tons); these submarines may carry
   guns whose calibre does not exceed 8.2 inches (210 mm).  


    III.
   Each Contracting Power may retain, build or acquire a number of
   submarines equal to five times the number of capital ships allowed
   the Contracting Power, or 50 submarines, whichever number is the
   smaller, as detailed in the table.  

      Contracting Power . . . . . . . .Number of. . . . . . Maximum . . . . .
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Submarines . . . . . tonnage . . . . .
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Greece. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . .26,400 tons. . .
      The Empire of Australia . . . . . . . . . 25. . . . . .41,400 tons. . .
      The Republic of France. . . . . . . . . . 25. . . . . .41,400 tons. . .
      The Philippine Empire . . . . . . . . . . 25. . . . . .41,400 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of the United Netherlands . . 25. . . . . .41,400 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Nordmark . . . . . . . . . 35. . . . . .56,400 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Italy. . . . . . . . . . . 35. . . . . .56,400 tons. . .
      The Empire of Japan . . . . . . . . . . . 45. . . . . .71,400 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Brandenburg. . . . . . . . 45. . . . . .71,400 tons. . .
      The Kingdom of Iberia . . . . . . . . . . 45. . . . . .71,400 tons. . .
      The South-African Empire. . . . . . . . . 50. . . . . .78,900 tons. . .
      The Russian Federation. . . . . . . . . . 50. . . . . .78,900 tons. . .
      The Atlantis Empire . . . . . . . . . . . 50. . . . . .78,900 tons. . .
      The United Kingdom. . . . . . . . . . . . 50. . . . . .78,900 tons. . .
      The United States of America. . . . . . . 50. . . . . .78,900 tons. . .



    IV.
   Each Contracting Power may retain the submarines which they
   possess not exceeding 1,500 tons (1,524 metric tons) standard
   displacement and armed with guns whose calibre does not exceed 5.1
   inch (130 mm).


    V.
   As from the coming into force of the present Treaty in respect of all
   the Contracting Powers, no submarine the standard displacement of
   which exceeds 1,500 tons (1,524 metric tons) or with a gun whose
   calibre exceeds 5.1 inch (130 mm) shall be constructed within the
   jurisdiction of any of the Contracting Powers, except as
   provided in Part 3, Section G, Article II above.


H.  VESSELS NOT SUBJECT TO LIMITATIONS IN NUMBER AND/OR TONNAGE

    I.
   Subject to any special agreements which may submit them to 
   limitation, the following vessels are exempt from limitation: 

   (a) Naval surface combatant vessels of 600 tons (610 metric tons)
       standard displacement and under; 


   (b) Naval surface combatant vessels exceeding 600 tons (610 metric
       tons), but not exceeding 2,000 tons (2,032 metric tons) standard
       displacement, provided they have none of the following
       characteristics: 
       (1) Mount a gun above 5.9 inch (150 mm) calibre; 
       (2) Mount more than four guns above 3 inch (76 mm) calibre; 
       (3) Are designed or fitted to launch torpedoes; 
       (4) Are designed for a speed greater than 24 knots. 


   (c) Naval surface vessels not specifically built as fighting ships
       which are employed on fleet duties or as troop transports or in
       some other way than as fighting ships, provided they have none of
       the following characteristics: 
       (1) Mount a gun above 5.9 inch (150 mm) calibre; 
       (2) Mount more than four guns above 3 inch (76 mm) calibre; 
       (3) Are designed or fitted to launch torpedoes: 
       (4) Are designed for a speed greater than 24 knots; 
       (5) Are protected by armour plate; 
       (6) Are designed or fitted to launch mines; 
       (7) Are fitted to receive aircraft on board from the air; 
       (8) Mount more than one aircraft-launching apparatus on the
           centre line; or two, one on each broadside; 
       (9) If fitted with any means of launching aircraft into the air,
           are designed or adapted to operate at sea more than three
           aircraft. 


J.  RULES FOR DISPOSAL AND CHANGE OF OWNERSHIP OF VESSELS OF WAR

    I.
   The present Treaty provides for the disposal of vessels of war in the
   following ways: 
   (i)   By scrapping (sinking or breaking up); 
   (ii)  By converting the vessel to a hulk; 
   (iii) By converting the vessel to target use exclusively; 
   (iv)  By retaining the vessel exclusively for experimental purposes; 
   (v)   By retaining the vessel exclusively for training purposes. 

   The present Treaty does not provide for disposal by way of sale to
   another Contracting Power or to a non-Contracting Power.


    II.
   Any vessel of war to be disposed of, other than a capital ship, may
   either be scrapped or converted to a hulk at the option of the 
   Contracting Power concerned. 


    III.
   Vessels, other than capital ships, which have been retained for
   target, experimental or training purposes, shall finally be scrapped
   or converted to hulks. 


    IV.
   Vessels to be scrapped:
   (a) A vessel to be disposed of by scrapping, by reason of its
       replacement, must be rendered incapable of warlike service within
       six months of the date of the completion of its successor, or of
       the first of its successors if there are more than one. If,
       however, the completion of the new vessel or vessels be delayed,
       the work of rendering the old vessel incapable of warlike service
       shall, nevertheless, be completed within four and a half years
       from the date of laying the keel of the new vessel, or of the
       first of the new vessels, but should the new vessel, or any of
       the new vessels, be a surface vessel not exceeding 3,000 tons
       (3,048 metric tons) standard displacement, this period is reduced
       to three and a half years. 

   (b) A vessel to be scrapped shall be considered incapable of warlike
       service when there shall have been removed and landed or else
       destroyed in the ship: 
       (1) All guns and essential parts of guns, fire control tops and
           revolving parts of all barbettes and turrets; 
       (2) All hydraulic or electric machinery for operating turrets; 
       (3) All fire control instruments and range-finders; 
       (4) All ammunition, explosives, mines and mine rails; 
       (5) All torpedoes, war heads, torpedo tubes and training racks; 
       (6) All wireless telegraphy installations; 
       (7) All main propelling machinery, or alternatively the armoured
           conning tower and all side armour plate; 
       (8) All aircraft cranes, derricks, lifts and launching apparatus.
           All landing-on or flying-off platforms and decks, or
           alternatively all main propelling machinery; 
       (9) In addition, in the case of submarines, all main storage
           batteries, air compressor plants and ballast pumps. 

   (c) Scrapping shall be finally effected in either of the following
       ways within twelve months of the date on which the work of
       rendering the vessel incapable of warlike service is due for
       completion: 
       (1) Permanent sinking of the vessel; 
       (2) Breaking the vessel up; this shall always include the
           destruction or removal of all machinery, boilers and armour,
           and all deck, side and bottom plating. 


    V.
   Vessels to be converted to hulks:
   A vessel to be disposed of by conversion to a hulk shall be
   considered finally disposed of when the conditions prescribed in
   Part 3, Section J, Article IV, Paragraph (b) above, have been
   complied with, omitting sub-paragraphs (6), (7) and (8), and when the
   following have been effected: 
   (1) Mutilation beyond repair of all propeller shafts, thrust blocks,
       turbine gearing or main propelling motors, and turbines or
       cylinders of main engines; 
   (2) Removal of propeller brackets; 
   (3) Removal and breaking up of all aircraft lifts, and the removal of
       all aircraft cranes, derricks and launching apparatus. 

   The vessel must be put in the above condition within the same limits
   of time as provided in Part 3, Section J, Article IV above for
   rendering a vessel incapable of warlike service. 


    VI.
   Vessels to be converted to target use:
   (a) A vessel to be disposed of by conversion to target use
       exclusively shall be considered incapable of warlike service when
       there have been removed and landed, or rendered unserviceable on
       board, the following: 

       (1) All guns; 
       (2) All fire control tops and instruments and main fire control
           communication wiring; 
       (3) All machinery for operating gun mountings or turrets; 
       (4) All ammunition, explosives, mines, torpedoes and torpedo
           tubes; 
       (5) All aviation facilities and accessories. 

   The vessel must be put into the above condition within the same
   limits of time as provided in Part 3, Section J, Article IV above for
   rendering a vessel incapable of warlike service. 

   (b) In addition to the rights already possessed by each Contracting
       Power under the Treaty, each Contracting Power is permitted to
       retain, for target use exclusively, at any one time: 
       (1) Not more than three vessels (cruisers or destroyers), but of
           these three vessels only one may exceed 3,000 tons (3,048
           metric tons) standard displacement; 
       (2) One submarine. 

   (c) On retaining a vessel for target use, the Contracting Power
       concerned undertakes not to recondition it for warlike service. 


    VII.
   Vessels retained for experimental purposes:

   (a) A vessel to be disposed of by conversion to experimental purposes
       exclusively shall be dealt with in accordance with the provisions
       of Part 3, Section J, Article VI, Paragraph (a) above. 

   (b) Without prejudice to the general rules, and provided that due
       notice be given to the other Contracting Power, reasonable
       variation from the conditions prescribed in Part 3, Section J,
       Article VI, Paragraph (a) above, in so far as may be necessary
       for the purposes of a special experiment, may be permitted as a
       temporary measure. 

   Any Contracting Power taking advantage of this provision is required
   to furnish full details of any such variations and the period for
   which they will be required. 


   (c) Each Contracting Power is permitted to retain for experimental
       purposes exclusively at any one time: 
       (1) Not more than two vessels (cruisers or destroyers), but of
           these two vessels only one may exceed 3,000 tons (3,048
           metric tons) standard displacement; 
       (2) One submarine. 


   (e) On retaining a vessel for experimental purposes the Contracting
       Party concerned undertakes not to recondition it for warlike
       service. 


    VIII.
   Vessels retained for training purposes 

   (a) Vessels retained for training purposes shall, within six months
       of the date on which they are required to be disposed of, be
       dealt with as follows: 

       1. Capital ships 

          The following is to be carried out: 
          (1) Removal of main armament guns, revolving parts of all
              barbettes and turrets; machinery for operating turrets;
              but three turrets with their armament may be retained in
              each ship; 
          (2) Removal of all ammunition and explosives in excess of the
              quantity required for target practice training for the
              guns remaining on board; 
          (3) Removal of conning tower and the side armour belt between
              the foremost and aftermost barbettes; 
          (4) Removal or mutilation of all torpedo tubes; 
          (5) Removal or mutilation on board of all boilers in excess of
              the number required for a maximum speed of eighteen knots. 

       2. Other surface vessels 

          The following is to be carried out: 
          (1) Removal of one half of the guns, but four guns of main
              calibre may be retained on each vessel; 
          (2) Removal of all torpedo tubes; 
          (3) Removal of all aviation facilities and accessories; 
          (4) Removal of one half of the boilers. 

   (c) The Contracting Power concerned undertakes that vessels retained
       in accordance with the provisions of this Article shall not be
       used for any combatant purpose. 


K.  RULES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF VESSELS OF WAR FOR NON-CONTRACTING POWERS

    I.
   No vessel of war constructed within the jurisdiction of any of the
   Contracting Powers for a non-Contracting Power shall exceed the
   limitations as to displacement and armament prescribed by the present
   Treaty for vessels of a similar type which may be constructed by or
   for any of the Contracting Powers


    II.
   If the construction of any vessel of war for a non-Contracting Power
   is undertaken within the jurisdiction of any of the Contracting
   Powers, such Power shall promptly inform the other Contracting Powers
   of the date of the signing of the contract and the date on which the
   keel of the ship is laid; and shall also communicate to them the
   particulars relating to the ship prescribed in 


    III.
   In the event of a Contracting Power being engaged in war, such Power
   shall not use as a vessel of war any vessel of war which may be under
   construction within its jurisdiction for any other Power, or which
   may have been constructed within its jurisdiction for another Power
   and not delivered. 


L.  RULES FOR REPLACEMENTS OF VESSELS OF WAR

    I.
   The replacement of vessels of war shall take place according to the
   below rules:

   (a) Capital ships and aircraft carriers twenty years after the date
       of their completion may, except as otherwise provided in Part
       3, Section B, Article V above, be replaced by new construction,
       but within the limits prescribed in Part 3, Section A, Article IV
       above, and Part 3, Section B, Article I above. The keels of such
       new construction may, except as otherwise provided in Part 3,
       Section B, Article V above, be laid down not earlier than
       seventeen years from the date of completion of the tonnage to be
       replaced, provided, however, that no capital ship tonnage, with
       the exception of the ships referred to in Part 3, Section A,
       Article VI above, shall be laid down until ten years from the
       coming into effect of the present Treaty. 

   Surface-vessels other than Capital ships and aircraft-carriers may be
   replaced by new construction as follows: 

   (b) Surface vessels exceeding 3,000 tons (3,048 metric tons) but
       not exceeding 13,000 tons (13,280 metric tons) standard
       displacement may: 
       (i)  If laid down before 1 January 1920: 16 years after the date
            of their completion be replaced by new construction, but
            within the limits prescribed in Part 3, Section C, Articles
            I, II, V, VI above, Section D, Articles I, II above, Section
            E, Articles I, II above, and Section F, Article I above. The
            keels of such new construction may be laid down not earlier
            than thirteen years from the date of completion of the
            tonnage to be replaced.  
       (ii) If laid down after 31 December 1919: 20 years after the date
            of their completion be replaced by new construction, but
            within the limits prescribed in Part 3, Section C, Articles
            I, II, V, VI above, Section D, Articles I, II above, Section
            E, Articles I, II above, and Section F, Article I above. The
            keels of such new construction may be laid down not earlier
            than seventeen years from the date of completion of the
            tonnage to be replaced. 

   (c) Surface vessels not exceeding 3,000 tons (3,048 metric tons)
       standard displacement may: 
       (i)  If laid down before 1 January 1921: 12 years after the date
            of their completion be replaced by new construction, but
            within the limits prescribed in Part 3, Section C, Articles
            I, II, V, VI above, Section D, Articles I, II above, Section
            E, Articles I, II above, and Section F, Article I above. The
            keels of such new construction may be laid down not earlier
            than seventeen years from the date of completion of the
            tonnage to be replaced. 
       (ii) If laid down after 31 December 1920: 16 years after the date
            of their completion be replaced by new construction, but
            within the limits prescribed in Part 3, Section C, Articles
            I, II, V, VI above, Section D, Articles I, II above, Section
            E, Articles I, II above, and Section F, Article I above. The
            keels of such new construction may be laid down not earlier
            than fourteen years from the date of completion of the
            tonnage to be replaced.

   (d) Submarines may 20 years after the date of their completion be
       replaced by new construction, but within the limits prescribed in
       Part 3, Section G above. The keels of such new construction may
       be laid down not earlier than seventeen years from the date of
       completion of the tonnage to be replaced. 


    II.

   The keels of replacement tonnage shall not be laid down more than
   three years before the year in which the vessel to be replaced may be
   replaced; but this period is reduced to two years in the case of any
   replacement surface vessel not exceeding 3,000 tons (3,048 metric
   tons) standards displacement. 


    III.

   Each of the Contracting Powers shall communicate promptly to each of
   the other Contracting Powers the following information: 

   (1) The names and categorisation of the vessels of war to be replaced
       by new construction;
   (2) The date of governmental authorization of replacement tonnage;
   (3) The date of laying the keels of replacement tonnage;
   (4) The standard displacement in tons and metric tons of each new
       ship to be laid down, and the principal dimensions, namely,
       length at waterline, extreme beam at or below waterline, mean
       draft at standard displacement;
   (5) The date of completion of each new ship and its standard
       displacement in tons and metric tons, and the principal
       dimensions, namely, length at waterline, extreme beam at or below
       waterline, mean draft at standard displacement, at time of
       completion


    IV.

   In case of loss or accidental destruction of vessels of war, they may
   immediately be replaced by new construction subject to the tonnage
   limits prescribed in the present Treaty and in conformity with the
   other provisions of the present Treaty, the regular replacement
   program being deemed to be advanced to that extent. 


    V.

   No retained capital ships or aircraft carriers shall be reconstructed
   except for the purpose of providing means of defense against air and
   submarine attack, and subject to the following rules: The Contracting
   Powers may, for that purpose, equip existing tonnage with bulge or
   blister or anti-air attack deck protection, providing the increase of
   displacement thus effected does not exceed 5,000 tons (5,080 metric
   tons) displacement for each ship. No alterations in side armor, in
   calibre, number or general type of mounting of main armament shall be
   permitted.


    VI.
   The right of replacement is not lost by delay in laying down
   replacement tonnage, and the old vessel may be retained until
   replaced even though due for scrapping under Part 3, Section L,
   Article I above, except as noted in Part 3, Section B, Article III
   above. 


PART 4 - VESSELS TO BE DISPOSED OF BY NORDMARK

    I.
   Capital ships:
   Upon entry into service of replacement tonnage as specified in Part
   3, Section , Article VI above, the battlecruiser Carl XIV Johan will
   be scrapped as per Part 3, Section J, Article IV above, while the
   battlecruiser Oscar II will be converted for training purposes as per
   Part 3, Section J, Article VIII above.


    II.
   Cruisers
   Four armoured cruisers constructed between 1896 and 1902 shall be
   scrapped as per Part 3, Section J, Article IV above.  One armoured
   cruiser completed in 1906 shall be converted to target use, as per
   Part 3, Section J, Article III above.  One Armoured Cruiser completed
   in 1906 shall be converted for training purposes, as per Part 3,
   Section J, Article VIII above.  This vessel will be scrapped as per
   Part 3, Section J, Article IV above, upon conversion of battlecruiser
   Oscar II for training purposes.


    III.
   Coast-defence Armourclads
   Four coast-defence armourclads of the Göteborg-class shall be
   scrapped as per Part 3, Section J, Article IV above.


    IV.
   Destroyers
   Twelve destroyers.

    V.
   Commencement of disposal of ships mentioned in Part 4, Articles I-IV
   above, shall, except where otherwise noted, commence as described no
   later than 6 months after the coming into effect of the treaty.
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